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      Tornado victims told federal help won't come

      Residents met with officials in Revere Wedneday night.

      People in Revere, Massachusetts continue to clean up after an EF-2 tornado devastated 65 homes and businesses Monday.

      Many of the families whose homes were devastated by the tornado that ripped through Revere Monday need all the help they can get.

      At a meeting Monday night they were told help won't be coming from the federal government.

      A room full of tornado victims voiced their frustrations Wednesday. They met with the mayor to hear about help that might never arrive. Some 65 homes and businesses were devastated, 13 were deemed uninhabitable. For some the loss is more than they can bear, to the federal government though it isn't devastating enough, FEMA won't be stepping in.

      "We are going to continue to fight for every dollar that we can to subsidize your losses," said Mayor Dan Rizzo.

      "Then they're telling us the insurance company is only going to pay 500 dollars for the tree removal, I'm having anxiety attacks. What do you mean the estimates we're getting are in the thousands," said homeowner Darlene Naso.

      It's the first tornado touchdown in Suffolk County since 1950, but it isn't big enough to register on a national scale. Desperate homeowners are now looking to the state of Massachusetts for help.

      "So that's why we're asking the governor to help us out. Let's get MEMA to help us out. If FEMA isn't going to help us we need some sort of help from the commonwealth," said Revere resident Niko Kostopoulos.

      The mayor held the meeting to provide information and an opportunity for people here to vent. Not everyone found it helpful.

      "They said they're going to do what they can but we're going to have to fight. The community together is going to have to fight," said Kristen Hanscom.

      The mayor did say at the meeting that a private relief fund will be made available Friday to help some uninsured residents with their losses. Rizzo did not say how much money that private relief fund has garnered so far.