MENU
component-ddb-728x90-v1-01-desktop

Expectant moms get wellness help from unexpected entrepeneur

Premama launched in 2011 with a prenatal vitamin mix. Since then, the company has created seven more products, lining the shelves of some big name stores. (WJAR)

Inside a West Greenwich warehouse sit thousands of pretty little boxes, waiting to be shipped to some long-overlooked consumers.

“There's been a lot of products for baby out there, but not a lot of people trying to take care of the moms,” says Premama founder Dan Aziz.

From prenatal vitamin drink mixes to sleep aid chews, Premama supplements are changing the face of maternity wellness.

“I worked to create the first pill-free prenatal multivitamin,” says Aziz.

It's hard to believe that, up until a few years ago, pill-free prenatal supplements didn't exist.

It’s even more surprising that a 21-year-old Brown University student recognized the void while working on a class assignment.

“I decided to head to Whole Foods on North Main Street in Providence to see what was there that people may like or may need, and came across a number of women in the whole body section who said they wish that Whole Foods carried an alternative to prenatal horse pills,” recalls Aziz.

Just like that, Aziz had a multimillion-dollar idea -- and a career.

Premama launched in 2011 with a prenatal vitamin mix. Since then, the company has created seven more products, lining the shelves of some big name stores.

“Upwards of 9,000 stores, from CVS to GNC to Walgreens, Sprouts,” says Jamie Schapiro, chief marketing officer of Premama.

In 2016, Premama saw an astounding 430 percent year-to-year growth.

And the company isn’t done growing.

Premama plans to introduce five more products in 2018, designed to help create healthy families. New products include a post birth control cleanse and a male fertility supplement.

“I'm surprised but also hungry for more, in terms of how much it's grown,” says Aziz.

Premama donates 1 percent of all profits to Vitamin Angels, a nonprofit organization that brings provides vitamins to mothers and children at risk of malnutrition.

Trending