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NBC 10 I-Team: Jurors hear phone calls between Warwick man, ISIS terror suspects

For the second straight day, Warwick's Nicholas Rovinski took the witness stand Thursday, Sept. 21, 2017, for the government in the trial against his former friend David Wright in Boston's federal court. (WJAR)

For the second straight day, Warwick's Nicholas Rovinski took the witness stand Thursday for the government in the trial against his former friend David Wright in Boston's federal court.

Wright is accused of conspiring to help ISIS with Rovinski and Wright's dead uncle Usaamah Rahim. Rovinski pled guilty and flipped last year.

On Thursday, Jurors heard phone calls between the three men, who were laughing wildly about beheadings. Rahim was heard in a conversation with Wright in 2015 saying, "I just made a wonderful purchase,” referring to a knife he had just bought.

Rahim eventually used the knife he when he lunged at police and the FBI. He was shot and killed in June of 2015.

Rovinksi said the lone act surprised both him and Wright. The three had met on a beach in Warwick and talked about killing cops, stealing their guns and beheading conservative blogger Pamela Geller.

"This country is messed up from its' founding day," said Rovinski on the FBI's recorded call. The 26-year-old said they tried to conceal their plans and he wanted to create his own website so the government couldn't monitor their communications.

At one point, they all agreed to shut their cell phones off in Rhode Island to avoid detection by the feds. Rahim left his on and used it to look up Domino's pizza.

Wright's attorney, Jessica Hedges painted a picture of a bumbling trio with no money, no jobs, no girlfriends living with their parents and having no conceivable way of carrying out their murderous plans. She made jurors know Rovinski cut a deal in August of 2016 to shave time off his sentence and asked him if questioned himself?

"At one point in time, but not now," said Rovinski.

By helping the government, Rovinski could shave time off his sentence in December. Instead of 22 years in prison, he could receive 15 years, making him eligible for release in his late 30s.

Rovinski also told the court Thursday he's given the government information on others, more than three people, he said.

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