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Raimondo calls Kilmartin's accusations against her concerning 38 Studios 'inaccurate'

Attorney General Peter Kilmartin and Gov. Gina Raimondo spar over the release of 38 Studios documents. (WJAR)

NBC 10's Dan Jaehnig talks to Gov. Gina Raimondo about legislation she signed that makes undisclosed records from Rhode Island's investigation of 38 Studios public.

"I was against 38 Studios from the very beginning and believe that Rhode Islanders deserve to know what happened," Raimondo previously noted. "It's time for Attorney General Kilmartin to stop opposing the will of the people, and to disclose all 38 Studios investigation records that his office has done everything to block from public view."

Soon after, Kilmartin offered a rebuttal, claiming that a court ruling to keep the records private remains.

"It is ironic and politically calculated for the Governor to talk about the 'will of the people' when it was she and Colonel (Ann) Assumpico who in effect stopped the investigation when it was set to be reactivated at the conclusion of the civil litigation," Kilmartin said. "Regardless of the Court outcome or her political posturing in this case, the public will never know the whole truth because she effectively put a stop to it."

He went on to say that Raimondo "conveniently forgets that she promised an independent investigation into the matter, but has broken her promise to do so. From the outset, the Attorney General has not been opposed to the release of documents. He has only sought clarification from the Court as to what can be released in accordance with the statute and to ensure release of documents does not violate privilege, Court rules, or the recent decision by the Presiding Justice. The Governor is attempting to upend centuries of jurisprudence and precedence for political purposes, and that needs to be properly addressed in the appropriate forum, which is the Courts."

But Raimondo told Jaehnig that Kilmarrtin's statements are "completely false" and "inaccurate."

"I had nothing to do with it," the governor said, referring to Kilmartin's claim that she and Assumpico put a halt to the investigation. "And actually, it was the attorney general and the former colonel who had a press conference, saying that the investigation was closed. So, I don't know what the point of his grandstanding is. I've been very clear -- I didn't vote for this deal. The attorney general did when he was the legislature. I've opposed it from day one and I'm on the side of disclosure."

Jaehnig pressed the governor, asking if she thinks Kilmartin has something to hide.

She responded, "I don't know. But all I know is he's fighting to keep things secret when I think the public deserves to know," adding that she fought against the deal. "I don't understand why he's fighting me on basic disclosure."

But Jaehnig went on to ask Raimondo why she never followed through after she promised voters during campaign season that she would appoint an independent investigator.

"You never did that and now you're calling for records to be made public ahead of what some would say election season," Jaehnig said, questioning if if Kilmartin has a fair point when he accused Raimondo of political posturing.

Yet, Raimondo noted that she has been fighting the release of the documents for two years and that it has noting to do with the upcoming election season.

"One of the first things I did when I became governor was -- we went to the court and asked for permission to released all the documents in the litigation. And the court gave us that and we released it," she said. "I fought for two years to get money back. We reclaimed almost $60,000 in taxpayer money, and now I'm still fighting before the court to get the Grand Jury documents out Yesterday, I signed a bill to require more disclosure. So, again, I think I was one of the very first people on the public stage to oppose this deal way back when it was under consideration, so I've been on the right side of this for years and I'm not going to stop fighting until the public gets full disclosure."


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