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Lawmakers looking to ban 'bump stocks' in wake of Las Vegas massacre

The Las Vegas shooter modified his semi-automatic rifles to shoot many more rounds, almost like a machine gun, with an adapter known as a bump stock. It’s easily attached to a rifle, and can be purchased for less than $100 online, with free delivery and no licensing. Some lawmakers are calling for that to change.

The Las Vegas shooter modified his semi-automatic rifles to shoot many more rounds, almost like a machine gun, with an adapter known as a bump stock.

It’s easily attached to a rifle, and can be purchased for less than $100 online, with free delivery and no licensing.

Some lawmakers are calling for that to change.

With a bump stock, a semi-automatic weapon can fire upwards of 500 rounds per minute. Sports shooters have no use for them.

“I’ve tried it once I will never try it again. I think it’s dangerous, I really do,” Sal Caiozzo of West Greenwich told NBC 10 News.

Caiozzo was trained in the military with true automatic weapons and said the bump stock makes a gun very inaccurate. He speculates why a shooter would want one.

“Maybe just so someone can say, ‘Look at me. I just fired an automatic,’” Caiozzo said.

Gun shop owner John Francis of Competition Shooting shared similar sentiments.

“I looked at them as kind of a fad,” he said.

For target shooters, Francis said, the attachment rips through so much ammunition that they make a shooting session too costly. One customer who bought one, sold it.

“A simple range trip where your average shooter might use 50 to 100 rounds -- even a couple hundred rounds of 556 ammo -- he was burning through 500, and then some. And at $200 a whack for that kind of amount, that just got to be too expensive,” Francis said.

Shooters said the attachment makes the gun virtually useless for target shooting.

“In my experience, and from what I saw, you cannot hit what you’re aiming for, but by luck,” Rep. Michael Chippendale from Foster said.

Sen. Jack Reed has introduced a bill in the Senate to ban the devices. He put out a statement on Thursday, saying in part, “Semi-automatic rifles typically have a rate of fire between 45 and 60 rounds per minute. A bump stock, or other similar device increases the semi-automatic rifle's rate of fire between 400 and 800 rounds per minute.

The Automatic Gun Fire Prevention Act would ban the sale, transfer, importation, manufacture or possession of bump stocks, trigger cranks and similar accessories that accelerate a semi-automatic rifle’s rate of fire.”

Congressman David Cicilline has submitted similar legislation in the House of Representatives.

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