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StormTeam10: 3 Hurricanes in the Atlantic now

For the first time in seven years, there are three active hurricanes in the Atlantic Basin. Of course, Hurricane Irma is the biggest and most notorious, but Hurricane Katia, with 75 mph wind, is in the Gulf of Mexico, while Hurricane Jose, also with 75mph, churns in the far eastern Atlantic. (WJAR)

For the first time in seven years, there are three active hurricanes in the Atlantic Basin.

Of course, Hurricane Irma is the biggest and most notorious, but Hurricane Katia, with 75 mph wind, is in the Gulf of Mexico, while Hurricane Jose, also with 75mph, churns in the far eastern Atlantic.

The worst of Irma will miss Peurto Rico, as it's well-defined eye assess north of the island -- BUT the northern edge of the island will still feel hurricane force gusts, several inches of rain and some moderate storm surge.

As for Irma and where the storm MAY track as it nears Florida, here is the latest...and I urge you to NOT focus on the forecast line, rather look at the cone of forecast "uncertainty" farther out in the forecast period.

There is a 400-plus mile difference from the western edge of that cone to the eastern edge, which means the hurricane COULD be as far west as the western side of Florida OR as far east as the open waters of the Atlantic well offshore of the Florida coast by Monday.

Evryone in Florida has to take this storm seriously, especially the lowest lying areas from the Keys north through Miami, Fort Lauderdale andWest Palm Beach. We still may get a landfall along the Georgia or South Carolina coastline Monday, as well.

I want to stress that the steering winds in the atmosphere STILL do not favor a pattern that would pull Irma north on a direct line to southern New England, but we are still talking about a forecast that is five to seven days in the future. Things change and this projected path still very well could shift around a bit more.

Thanks for reading and stay with StormTeam10 for updates on all of these storms.

Mark

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